October 2016: How to use LinkedIn strategically.

LinkedIn is a great tool for getting your profile out in front of potential employers. And not just a more staid version of social networking. The fact is, LinkedIn is a great tool for what are perhaps the most important aspects of searching for a job-networking and online presence.

First of all, you can put your work profile up there for the world to see. While you still should send targeted resumes for positions you want to apply for, LinkedIn gives everyone a snapshot of your capabilities. So if a potential employer is just looking around before he or she even posts an opening, you’re out there. Here are some tips for using LinkedIn to its greatest advantage:

1. Avoid overused keywords just as you would on a resume.

Some of the overused buzzwords to avoid are:
– extensive experience
– innovative
– motivated
– results-oriented
– dynamic
– proven track record
– team-player
– fast-paced
– problem-solver
– entrepreneurial

2. Take advantage of LinkedIn apps like:

– WordPress
This app will synch your WordPress blog posts automatically with your profile. It offers a filtering option if you don’t want to share every entry with your LinkedIn connections-you can just use a special LinkedIn tag.

– Events
The Events application adds a box to your profile that shows what events people in your network are attending. This helps you find events based on your industry and job function. You can sort by most popular events, search for events, and create new ones.

– SlideShare Presentations
With this app, you can share presentations and documents with your LinkedIn network and upload portfolios, resume, conference talks, PDFs, marketing/sales presentations or even a video of yourself.


Summarised by the TechSupport team from an article by Toni Bowers posted on TechRepublic.

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September 2016: Five must-have open source productivity tools

You don’t have to turn to proprietary software to get your work done. Here are five feature-rich open-source alternatives.

What do we need to produce our work? We must produce documents, we must be able to create/manipulate images, we must manage money, and we must be able to communicate and schedule. These constants dictate that we have sound tools to handle those tasks. Don’t think Microsoft (and other creators of proprietary software) hold a monopoly on productivity. The open-source community has done a great job of creating tools perfectly suited to help you get your job done.

1: LibreOffice

LibreOffice is an open-source equivalent of Microsoft Office. It includes word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, drawing, and database tools. All the tools are compatible with their Microsoft Office counterparts and strictly follow open standards. LibreOffice is free of charge and is available across all platforms (Mac, Windows, and Linux).

2: Evolution

Evolution is to open source what Microsoft Outlook is to proprietary software. A groupware client with email, calendar, tasks, contacts, and notes, Evolution will help keep you connected and organized. Evolution is available only for the Linux platform. But if you need to connect Evolution to Exchange, there are tools available to allow that to happen.

3: GIMP

GIMP is one of the most powerful image editing/creating tools on the open-source market, offering similar user-friendliness to Photoshop. Some of the tasks you do with GIMP might take a few more steps than Photoshop requires. But in the end, the job gets done.

4: Scribus

Scribus is the easiest and most powerful way to create PDF documents in Linux. And this open-source tool isn’t just available for the Linux world. You can also enjoy the freedom of creating PDF (and editable PDF) documents on Mac and Windows. With a simple interface and all the features you’d expect in a PDF creation tool, Scribus will help you to get the job done quickly and easily.

5: GnuCash

GnuCash is the flagship personal and small business accounting software. Although it’s only a single-user tool, it can easily handle the management of small business finances. GnuCash is a double-entry accounting tool, with checking, savings, stocks, assets, expenses, and more. GnuCash offers scheduled transactions, transaction matching, financial calculations, and importing, among other things.

The open-source community has nearly every tool you need to get your work done efficiently. And that list of software grows every year. Soon, you’ll have no reason to work outside of the scope of open source in your office.


Summarised by the WOUGNET TechSupport team from an article by Jack Wallen posted on TechRepublic.

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August 2016: Learn how to stream live video on the social network

Facebook has unleashed a raft of new features this week. It’s part of an aggressive attempt to get users watching and creating live video content on the social network. While online live streams have been around for more than a decade, they’ve never been as easy to shoot or view on a platform as massive as Facebook.

Here are some quick user-friendly tips for getting the most out of the new format.

How to Shoot

For now, you can only broadcast live videos from Apple or Android mobile devices. To start, open up the status bar as if you’re going to make a new post. In the bottom right corner you’ll see an icon of a a camera with an eye on it.. That’s the “Live” button.

Press it, and you’ll get a chance to prep your Livestream. You can choose whether you want the stream to be shown to everyone on Facebook, only your friends or just you. This setting seems to default to whatever audience you selected for your last post, so make sure to check it before you begin streaming. You can also write a description of your Livestream during this prep phase.

Once your stream is going, other Facebook users will be able to comment on your video in real-time. If you’ve made your video public, you can control who gets to comment on it. In Facebook’s mobile app, hit the “More” button in the lower-right corner, then “Settings,” then “Account Settings,” then “Followers.” There, you select “Friends” or “Public” to pick which group can comment on your videos.

Facebook offers some general tips for hosting a successful Livestream. Tell people you’re broadcasting ahead of time so they know to look out for your video. During the stream, remind people to follow you so they get a notification every time you go live. Longer broadcasts tend to accumulate more viewers, so the company recommends streaming for at least five minutes.

Facebook is also incorporating Live streaming into groups and events, so it will be easy to share footage from a birthday party to people who can’t attend or stream a recreational sports league’s game directly to its Facebook group.

How to Watch

Like Facebook’s other video efforts, live video remains confusing to access on the social network. Sometimes, but not always, you’ll be alerted to a friend or Page going live via a notification. The company is building a video portal that will collect live content from friends and personalized topics of interest on a single page in its mobile app, but it hasn’t been launched to all devices yet. Live videos will also be attached to some trending topics soon.

you can learn more about using Facebook live here...

https://live.fb.com/about/ 

WOUGNET TECH TIPS

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July 2016: Recognize and Avoid These Popular Facebook Scams and Hoaxes

Think twice before sharing that Facebook status. The anatomy of an Internet hoax is simple. They’re often just plausible enough to be true — but outrageous enough to shock — and contain elements that provoke an emotional reaction. As the most popular social network in the world, Facebook is fertile ground for hoaxes and scams, which quickly go viral as people share posts from friends they trust. Before you heed the plea to share a post or click a link, take a few minutes to make sure you’re not falling prey to one of these popular scams.

Facebook to Start Charging Users.

Despite the fact that Facebook clearly states on its homepage that the site “is free, and always will be,” variations on this theme continue to pop up. Some versions of this popular urban legend include pricing details, or claim that it was confirmed by the news; almost all of them promise that if you copy and paste the update on your own wall, you’ll be exempt from having to pay. Regardless of how credible it may seem, Facebook has made it very clear that they have no plans to make users pay a fee just to belong to the site.

“I Can’t Believe [Celebrity] Did That!”

There are multiple variations on this particular hoax, which often presents as a video thumbnail accompanied by a salacious headline implying that a celebrity has done something outrageous. If you’re lured into clicking on the video, you’re often prompted to share before being allowed to see the video, or redirected to a malicious app that promises to show you once you’ve given the appropriate permissions – and once you’ve clicked “Accept,” the app proceeds to spam all your friends with the same type of video that tempted you. Other versions of this scam might force you to fill out a survey (and provide personal information that can then be used to spam you) or redirect you to an external site that infects your computer with malware. Avoid clicking on videos with scandalous headlines unless they’re from a reputable site. You can see what the source is by looking beneath the title.

Find out Who’s Viewing Your Profile.

This scam feeds on both ego and natural curiosity – it is human nature to wonder who’s been checking you out, so it’s not surprising that this is such a prolific hoax. You’re promised that if you click on a link you’ll be able to see every person who has looked at your Facebook profile – sometimes accompanied by an eye-catching headline that promises to show you who has been “stalking” you – but like the video hoaxes, these links just lead to malicious apps or websites. In order to protect the privacy of their users, Facebook doesn’t allow anyone to view their profile visitors, and there are no legitimate third-party apps that can do this, either.

Malicious Scripts.

Malicious script scams promise new features – such as the ability to see who views your timeline or add a “dislike” button to your posts – if you copy a piece of text into your browser’s address bar. Instead, the text is actually a script that hijacks your Facebook account to spam your friends and create events and pages. Avoid links that claim to be able to add new features to your Facebook account. Legitimate updates come directly from Facebook, not some fly-by-night third party.

Sick-Child Hoaxes.

You may think you’re doing a good thing by sharing posts about sick children, but in some cases, you may be causing the family even more pain. One particular post that’s been circulating for a few years, for example, shows a photo of a child and her mother with the claim that if it gets shared a certain number of times, the child will get a free heart transplant. In reality, the little girl in the photo, Zoe Chambers, passed away in 2008, and her mother Julie was distraught to find out that her daughter’s photo is being circulated across the social network. As a rule of thumb, it’s a good idea to only share such posts when you know the family. If it’s a stranger — and especially if some type of compensation is offered for each like or share — don’t repost before you research.


An article by Jacqui Lane posted on eHow and summarized by WOUGNET's Technical department

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June 2016: Cloud Computing - A blessing or a Curse?

There’s no doubt that cloud computing has made a huge splash in our technologically ubiquitous society. Its benefits help businesses with productivity and give consumers more convenience about back-ups and data storage. Still, there are a few issues that should be addressed for anyone, whether a business owner or average Joe computer user, before making the jump to any cloud computing solution.

Reduced Control

The popular concept of cloud computing involves offloading and archiving pertinent files and data to an off-site 3rd party company which guarantees virtually 100% uptime and secure access anytime anywhere. The problem is that you’re basically having another entity hang on to your confidential information which reduces the amount of control you have over that information. In addition, you have no idea where your information is being stored.

Legal Issues

Using cloud services also presents a potential legal headache for both you and the hosting company. For example, cloud service provider Dropbox recently experienced a security breach in which all accounts were accessible by entering ANY password for approximately four hours. While Dropbox was able to rectify the issue promptly, one of their users is now filing a lawsuit for the security issue.

Solutions

While there is zero way to completely prevent any type of cloud service issue, there are a few steps you can take to minimize the chance of having one of these issues compromise your confidential personal or business information.

i) Adopt a “Don’t keep all your eggs in one basket” approach which means only uploading the pertinent data that needs to be accessible to the necessary company personnel.

ii) You can also specify exactly, which employee(s) are allowed access to your cloud servers and make them aware of the heightened security involved with such access. (Increased accountability with updated IT security access/policies)

iii) You can also use a 3rd party encryption program such as True Crypt and encrypt all information before uploading it to your cloud service. This provides additional security to what the Cloud service provider offers as your data would be useless if intercepted (in any way) by unauthorized parties. (unless they can break through  the encryption)

iv) You can also save a copy of all your confidential information on your own secure personal or company network which provides an alternative access point in case the cloud service goes down for any reason.


Summarised from an article by Mark Tiongco published in Geeks.com.

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