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August 2022: Low Battery Settings in iPhone

We all know the iPhone drill: a "Low Battery. 20% battery remaining" alert, followed by options to tap Low Power Mode or deny reality by tapping Close. Apple added Low Power Mode as part of iOS9 in order to save battery, so should battery-conscious iPhone users just keep Low Power Mode on all the time now that we're on iOS16?

The reality of keeping Low Power Mode always on is that the pros and cons will depend on your iPhone model, how you use the phone, and how much you care about saving your battery charge. Learn exactly what Low Power Mode disables and how to keep it on permanently, if you want to give it a try.

For more, be sure that you're not charging your iPhone the wrong way, and learn why the iPhone battery meter icon is changing with iOS 16.1.

What is iPhone Low Power Mode?

Low Power Mode is an iOS setting that disables some iPhone features to save battery charge when it is low. Your iPhone will ask you if you want to turn on Low Power Mode when your battery drops to 20%, and then again at 10%.

Apple says that Low Power Mode reduces the amount of power that your iPhone is using to make your battery last longer.

You can tell when you are in Low Power Mode because your battery icon will be yellow. Your iPhone automatically turns off Low Power Mode when your battery charge reaches 80%.

Which features does iPhone Low Power Mode disable?

According to the official Apple support page, Low Power Mode makes these changes to conserve your battery's charge:

  1. Turns off 5G (except for video streaming)
  2. Sets your iPhone screen to turn off after 30 seconds of inactivity
  3. Reduces display brightness
  4. Lowers display refresh rate for iPhones with ProMotion
  5. Eliminates some visual effects
  6. Pauses iCloud Photos sync
  7. Suspends automatic downloads
  8. Pauses email fetch
  9. Stops background apps from refreshing

Low Power Mode also disables viewing videos in HDR, turns off the Always On display in iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max, disables video autoplay, and reduces CPU and GPU performance.

How do I turn on iPhone Low Power Mode?

The manual way to keep Low Power Mode on all the time would be to simply put your iPhone into Low Power Mode every time after you charge it. You can turn it on manually by going to Settings > Battery and toggling on Low Power Mode.

You can also turn on Low Power Mode manually with the iPhone Control Center or with Siri.

How do I turn on iPhone Lower Power Mode permanently?

But there's a simple way to "set it and forget it." To automatically keep your iPhone in Low Power Mode at all times, you'll need to get a little crafty and make your own Personal Automation using the Shortcuts app.

There are many ways to automatically set Low Power Mode using Shortcuts, but for me, the easiest method is to turn on Low Power Mode whenever the battery is less than 100%. That way, your iPhone is essentially in Low Power Mode all the time, but it can also create backups, complete downloads and receive updates when it's plugged in and charged at 100%.

Scroll all the way to the right on your iPhone home screen to get to your App Library, then scroll down and tap Shortcuts. Once the app is running, select Automation at the bottom of the screen, then tap the blue Create Personal Automation button.

On the New Animation screen, scroll down and select Battery Level. Tap the bottom option, Falls Below, and then move the slider all the way to the right for 100%. Then click Next. You've set your condition for triggering an action.

Now create the action to set your iPhone to Low Power Mode. On the Actions screen, click the blue Add Action button. You can then type in "Low" in the search box and tap Set Low Power Mode, or tap Scripting and find it under Device.

Once you've selected Set Low Power Mode, it will show up on your Actions screen as "Turn Low Power Mode On." Click Next. On the following New Automation screen, toggle Ask Before Running off to let Lower Power Mode be turned on automatically. If you want, you can request a notification for every time the automation runs.

Confirm "Don't Ask," then tap Done to finish. You're all set. Every time your battery drops below 100%, your iPhone will automatically switch into Low Power Mode.

How much battery charge does Low Power Mode save?

You're not going to get a definitive answer here. The value of Low Power Mode has been debated ever since it was introduced. While some estimates say battery charges will last about one and a half times longer using Low Power Mode, others show very little difference in battery usage.

If you're concerned with making your iPhone battery last longer, you'll simply need to try out Low Power Mode for yourself and see the difference.

My own experience squares with that early estimate of a battery charge that lasts about 50% longer on Low Power Mode. Anecdotally, I find that Low Power Mode matters less when I am using the phone more. The benefit of Low Power Mode seems greater when my phone is idle, or used sparingly for texts and 2FA messaging.

On weekdays, when I'm working and mostly using my laptop computer, I generally only need to charge my phone every other day if I leave it in Low Power Mode. That still includes activities like posting on social media, streaming music with Spotify and watching downloaded videos on Netflix. If I don't have Low Power Mode turned on permanently, I usually need to charge my phone every day.

 How to get rid of Low Power Mode

If you find that Low Power Mode doesn't save your battery, you can turn off the automation by going into Shortcuts and toggling off Enable This Animation. To erase it completely, swipe left on your Low Power Mode automation on the main Automation screen, then tap the red Delete button.

You can also create your own custom version of Low Power Mode by tweaking your iPhone settings to take some of the measures that Low Power Mode does. For example, you can save significant battery by stopping background apps from refreshing or adjusting your brightness settings.

Compiled by Technical Support sited from CNET

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